Today in Apple history: Sequel to ‘1984’ Mac ad bombs hard

January 20, 1985: Apple attempts to build on the triumph of the previous year’s “1984” Macintosh commercial with another Super Bowl ad. Called “Lemmings,” the ad for a new business platform called The Macintosh Office depicts blindfolded executives marching to their doom. The widely reviled ad will go down in history as one of Apple’s […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)

This slender camera goes where your iPhone wouldn’t dare [Deals]

Endoscopic cameras aren’t just for surgeons and spies. A compact, flexible, high definition camera can also be a seriously handy (and fun) tool. This WiFi HD Waterproof Endoscopic Camera is a great addition to any DIY toolkit. It’s super thin and flexible, sporting a 2 megapixel camera and an 8-way adjustable LED light. That makes […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)

Portrait Camera App ‘Focos’ Gains Real Lens Optical Effects and Improved Shooting Mode

Portrait Mode photo editor Focos received an update today that should pique the interest of dual-lens camera iPhone owners. The app recently made our end-of-year best iOS app list for its impressive granular aperture and bokeh adjustment tools, but version 1.2 builds on the existing feature set by adding the ability to apply real lens optical effects to depth images.

The update introduces a redesigned interface layout to accommodate the new preset lenses, which include Olympus Zuiko, Helios 44, CarlZeiss Jena, CarlZeiss Otus, Leica Noctilux, Minolta STF, Minolta RF250, A1, A2, A3, and A4.



In addition to the above lenses, users can create custom presets for images with depth information by combining multiple lens settings and saving them under a recognizable name. Fotos’ library of presets can also be re-organized for easy access from the editing menu.

Elsewhere in this update, a tilt-shift effect has been added to the app’s range of filters, offering users another level of control over the plane of focus when widening aperture, while a new ratio of 2.25:1 can be found in the cropping menu.

A torchlight has also been added to Focus’ built-in camera mode, which should help when taking Portrait Mode photos in low light, and the app now supports Bluetooth for taking photos remotely.

Lastly, a look at the general settings screen reveals an added ability to choose between JPEG, HEIC, and TIFF export formats, as well as a simple language selector, which now includes Persian.

Focos supports iPhone 7 Plus, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X, and is a free download from the App Store, although many pro features are behind a paywall. It costs $0.99 per month or $5.99 per year to unlock them, but there’s also a $9.99 lifetime access purchase option. [Direct Link]

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Cult of Mac Magazine: Apple says it will add $350 billion to U.S. economy and more!

Apple’s big tax break is about to unleash an avalanche of spending from the iPhone-maker. In a public statement earlier this week, Apple revealed its plans to contribute $350 billion to the U.S. economy over the next five years now that the fee for repatriating its mountain of overseas cash has been significantly lowered. In […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)

Tim Cook talks iPhone addiction, Paradise Papers, and more in new interview

Investors have recently called on Apple to add more parental controls to its devices to help in limiting things such as use time for young children. Following the company’s announcement that it would add more “robust” controls in a future update, Tim Cook has addressed the topic in an interview…

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Apple CEO Tim Cook Discusses Overusing Technology in New Interview

Apple this morning announced the expansion of its “Everyone Can Code” initiative to 70 educational institutions across Europe, and following the announcement, Apple CEO Tim Cook spoke at Harlow College in Essex, one of the schools that will adopt the new curriculum.

The Guardian shared several of Cook’s comments, which covered overuse of technology and boundaries for children.

Cook said he believes there are concepts that can’t be taught using technology, and in many courses, technology shouldn’t dominate.

“I don’t believe in overuse [of technology]. I’m not a person that says we’ve achieved success if you’re using it all the time,” he said. “I don’t subscribe to that at all.”

Even in computer-aided courses, such as graphic design, technology should not dominate, he said.

“There are are still concepts that you want to talk about and understand. In a course on literature, do I think you should use technology a lot? Probably not.”

According to Cook, Apple cares about children out of the classroom, a topic that’s notable as Apple investors recently urged Apple to do more to protect children from smartphone addiction.

Apple in early January said in a statement that it thinks deeply about how its products are used and the impact they have on people, including children. Apple takes its responsibility to protect children “very seriously,” and has promised more robust parental controls for iOS devices in the future.

Though he does not have children of his own, Cook says in his own personal life, he “put some boundaries” on his nephew. “There here are some things that I won’t allow; I don’t want them on a social network,” he said.

On the topic of learning to code, Cook spoke passionately, as he has done several times in the past. Learning to code, he says, is more important than learning a foreign language.

Cook said: “I think if you had to make a choice, it’s more important to learn coding than a foreign language. I know people who disagree with me on that. But coding is a global language; it’s the way you can converse with 7 billion people.”

Cook’s full commentary, which covers diversity, coding at an early age, and the importance of the press, can be read over at The Guardian.

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Apple CEO Tim Cook: I Don’t Believe in Overuse of Technology

Apple this morning announced the expansion of its “Everyone Can Code” initiative to 70 educational institutions across Europe, and following the announcement, Apple CEO Tim Cook spoke at Harlow College in Essex, one of the schools that will adopt the new curriculum.

The Guardian shared several of Cook’s comments, which covered overuse of technology and boundaries for children.

Cook said he believes there are concepts that can’t be taught using technology, and in many courses, technology shouldn’t dominate.

“I don’t believe in overuse [of technology]. I’m not a person that says we’ve achieved success if you’re using it all the time,” he said. “I don’t subscribe to that at all.”

“There are still concepts that you want to talk about and understand. In a course on literature, do I think you should use technology a lot? Probably not.”

According to Cook, Apple cares about children out of the classroom, a topic that’s notable as Apple investors recently urged Apple to do more to protect children from smartphone addiction.

Apple in early January said in a statement that it thinks deeply about how its products are used and the impact they have on people, including children. Apple takes its responsibility to protect children “very seriously,” and has promised more robust parental controls for iOS devices in the future.

Though he does not have children of his own, Cook says in his own personal life, he “put some boundaries” on his nephew. “There here are some things that I won’t allow; I don’t want them on a social network,” he said.

On the topic of learning to code, Cook spoke passionately, as he has done several times in the past. Learning to code, he says, is more important than learning a foreign language.

Cook said: “I think if you had to make a choice, it’s more important to learn coding than a foreign language. I know people who disagree with me on that. But coding is a global language; it’s the way you can converse with 7 billion people.”

Cook’s full commentary, which covers diversity, coding at an early age, and the importance of the press, can be read over at The Guardian.

Discuss this article in our forums